The venues of the Leipzig Bach Festival 2017

 

Leipzig Bach Festival 2017 takes place at more than 35 different venues in and around Leipzig. Here you can find information about all of them.

Böhlitz (near Thallwitz), Martin-Luther-Kirche

 

A previous, smaller building stood at this place from the eleventh century with just a 5m-high tower above the altar. The great-grandfather of Richard Wagner, Emanuel Wagner, was cantor and teacher at the church school from 1693 to 1703. In the eighteenth century, this tiny church became so dilapidated that the bells had to be removed. Although the past two harvests had failed and the approaching French Revolution was a cause of anxiety, the final church service was celebrated on Laetare Sunday (4th Sunday in Lent) 1799. Then, the church was razed to half a metre above the ground and new, luminous church built. Regarded as an »act of faith« , it was consecrated the same year on the anniversary of Luther's birth, November 10, 1799, and has been called Martin Luther Church since then.

The Leipzig University organ-builder, Johann Christian Immanuel Schweinefleisch, a pupil of Trost, Trebs and Hildebrandt, built the organ in 1770-1771. It is thought that the organ was first built in St. Peter’s Church in Leipzig and moved to Böhlitz in 1807. The organ has 34 pipes, 9 stops, and one manual and one pedalboard; in 1999 it was restored by Hermann Eule Orgelbau.

 

Address
Str. des Friedens 23
04808 Thallwitz OT Böhlitz

 

Borna, Emmauskirche and Stadtkirche St. Marien

Borna, a large district town with some 20,000 inhabitants, is located in the lowlands about 30 km south of Leipzig. The surrounding landscape still shows traces of the extensive lignite mining that took place over the last two centuries. In the 7th century, Slavic tribes settled here. About 200 years later, a castle and moat were constructed in the Whyra wetlands to protect the area. In the 12th century, a merchant settlement was established, and the Church of St. Cunigunde, a brick Roman basilica, was built nearby on the modern-day Königsplatz (King Square). Important military and trade roads ran through the area that have since been replaced by the B-95 and B-93 highways. The 15th century saw the construction of the Church of St. Mary and the City Hall (which burned down in 1668 and was subsequently rebuilt). Over the years, Borna has been visited by many famous historical figures, including Martin Luther, who gave sermons there several times in 1522 and 1523; and Napoleon, who on May 4, 1813 spent the night at the address Markt 13.

 

© Stefan Sudikatus

The Emmaus Church was originally built in Heuersdorf, a village around 12 km west of Borna that was given over to the lignite mining industry in 2009. Only the village's oldest building, the church, could be saved – by means of a spectacular transportation project in October, 2007. It now stands in Borna, next to the Church of St. Mary. 750 years ago, the Emmaus Church was constructed as a Roman aisleless church. Of the church's interior, only the triumphal arch connecting the nave and the choir is original Roman; the remaining structures are from the Baroque period. The 15th-century altar was rebuilt as a pulpit altar 400 years later. Originally, the Emmaus Church served as a fortification and place of refuge for the inhabitants of Heuersdorf, as there were no other solid stone buildings in the village. There, people sought not only to come closer to God, but also to escape from any threat to which they were exposed (such as enemy armies, bandits, fire, and natural disasters).

In 1850, Urban Kreutzbach, a famous organ builder from Central Germany, built an organ with 550 pipes for the church. Before being transported to Borna, it was removed and thoroughly restored by the Lindner Company of Radebeul in preparation for its renewed consecration in May, 2008.

 

The Church of St. Mary is a hall with three naves and a high gable roof. It has a broad tower on the west side, and an elongated single-naved choir on the east side. Construction of the choir was begun in 1411, and lasted several decades. It wasn't until October 16, 1456 that the church was consecrated to the patron bishop of Merseburg. Documents from six different altars from the late Middle Ages have been found for the church, but only the winged altar, a masterpiece by the Chemnitz woodworker Hans Witten, has survived.

 

Address
Martin-Luther-Platz
04552 Borna
www.emmauskirche-borna.de
www.kirche-im-leipziger-land.de

Burg (castle) Mildenstein

© Schlösserland Sachsen

 

Mildenstein Castle is first mentioned as being a part of the defensive fortress organisation of the German marches in 1046. Emperor Henry IV gave it to Wiprecht von Groitzsch in 1084. The Romanesque chapel is one of the oldest surviving parts of the castle, built around 1100. The emperor Frederick Barbarossa renovated the castle and annexes and made them an imperial estate in 1158. In 1188 Frederick Barbarossa drew up imperial documents in Leisnig. It was after this that the gate and cemetery were built. Margrave Wilhelm I had alterations carried out at Mildenstein Castle in the late fourteenth century to make it an object of ostentation. It was at this period that the granary, manor house and pages’ house were built. However, the castle was never used as a residence and remained a relatively unimportant seat of Wettin authority. The Polish king, Stanislaw Leszczynski, stayed at Mildenstein Castle from 1706 to 1707. The romantic park with its ruins was created by the Mirus family from 1798. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the castle housed the court, prison and staff accommodation.

 

Address
Burglehn 6
04703 Leisnig

Collmen, Village Church

© architektur-blicklicht.de

 

Collmen is first mentioned in a document dated 1215 from the Bishop of Meissen to the monastery of Buch, in which he confirms the transfer of the parish of Leisnig, of which »capella Chulme« was a part. The knight Conrad von Skoplau founded the church in the thirteenth century. The founder’s tomb can be seen on a pedestal of Rochlitz porphyr on the inner North wall of the nave. In 1908-1909, Pastor Gottfried Müller had the parish church rebuilt in art nouveau style. It was last restored in 2009.

On November 27, 1735 a schoolmaster of St. Thomas' School, Abraham Kriegel, married Johanna Charlotta Wendt in the church at Collmen. She was the eldest daughter of the local village pastor, Gottlob Ehrenfried Wendt. He had invited his school colleagues, the rector Johann August Ernesti and cantor Johann Sebastian Bach, to this family celebration. So it was that Bach came to the tiny village of Collmen – probably his only visit to the region of Grimma.

 

Address
Kirchstraße 5
04680 Colditz OT Collmen

 

Dieskau, Schloss and Park

© Olaf Meister

 

Renaissance Castle

Situated 7km from Halle an der Saale, Dieskau Castle and its extensive gardens are set in landscape of water meadows east of the tiny River Reide. It is thought that this Renaissance edifice was preceded by a mediaeval moated castle belonging to the lords of Dieskau. The East wing is a late-Gothic timber-framed construction (built in 1458), consisting of a masonry ground floor and two half-timbered storeys. The North wing, the core of which is also a timberwork construction over a masonry ground floor, dates from the second half of the fifteenth century. The South wing was built in two stages and completed in 1624. The West wing, running perpendicular to the South wing, was built during the seventeenth century. Between 1878 and around 1900 the castle underwent extensive alterations in the Neo-Renaissance style

On the upper storey of the East wing, a very remarkable, late-mediaeval timbered room called a Bohlenstube or Blockstube, has been conserved. The castle has one of the earliest figurative stucco ceilings (1619–1624), with elements of religious symbolism[UW1] . The exposed frescoes in the West wing are unique in the art history of the region and have not yet been fully examined. Above the conservatory on the ground floor of the West wing which leads into the gardens is the ballroom, which displays elements of Berlin Classicism and is still awaiting restoration. It gained its current appearance in the late eighteenth century, with its oval ceiling and semi-circular niches, which were formerly framed by wooden pillars and housed figures.

 

 

© Olaf Meister

Castle Gardens

The founder of Dieskau Castle gardens was the later chancellor of Halle University, Carl Christoph von Hoffmann. Becoming the owner of Dieskau Castle and the land which today makes up the gardens through his marriage with the widowed Therese von Lüder in 1770, he began transforming the largely treeless, marshy terrain into gardens in 1778. Von Hoffmann modelled his efforts on the concept of the English-style landscape garden which had just come into fashion – or rather the interpretation seen in the gardens at Wörlitz – soliciting the help and advice of Prince Franz of Anhalt-Dessau. The latter sent him the highly talented Johann Georg Gottlieb Schoch, just 20 years old, as a landscape gardener. In designing the gardens in the English style, Schoch drew in the water meadows of the Reide. Besides an intricate network of paths, he also built a system of ditches and channels fed by the Reide and crossed by wooden bridges. The work was completed around 1784. One of the first German landscape gardens in the English style was born. In the mid-nineteenth century, the von Bülow family bought the castle and gardens and largely maintained the gardens until they were expropriated in 1945.

Address
Schloßplatz 1
06184 Kabelsketal

Eisleben (city of Luther)

Eisleben is the second-largest town in Mansfeld-Südharz, a district in the eastern foothills of the Harz Mountains in Saxony-Anhalt. It is famous as the place where Martin Luther was born and died, and so since 1946 the town has been known as ‘Lutherstadt Eisleben’ (‘Eisleben, town of Luther’). In 1996, the memorials to Martin Luther in Eisleben and Wittenberg were declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

 

Martin Luther’s baptismal church

Ss. Peter and Paul’s Church is a late Gothic hall church with imposing vaulting and towering pillars. The choir is dominated by a late-Gothic altar dedicated to Saint Anne, and the centrepiece shows St. Anne together with her daughter, the Virgin Mary, and her grandson Jesus. St. Anne, Jesus’ grandmother, was highly venerated in the Middle Ages and is also the patron saint of miners. Consequently, one special feature of the altar’s predella is the depiction of the shepherds as miners.

Martin Luther was born on 10 November 1483 and baptized the next day – St. Martin’s Day – at Ss. Peter and Paul’s Church. The memory of his baptism is preserved by ‘Luther’s Font’ in the sanctuary, which was reconstructed from the remains of the original font used for the ceremony. It signifies the importance of Luther’s baptism, which was the most noteworthy event connecting the Protestant reformer to Eisleben. Following the completion of restoration work which began in January 2011, Ss. Peter and Paul’s was reopened on 29 April 2012.

 

 

Martin Luther’s birthplace

This is the place where Martin Luther was born on 10 November 1483. Although the actual house burned down to the ground during the Great Fire of Eisleben in 1689, it was subsequently rebuilt with its current Baroque apperance. Of particular interest is the overdoor with a half-length depiction of Martin Luther. The house’s appearance is also characterized by an arcade at the rear and a portico to one side.

Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Martin Luther’s birthplace was officially reopened on 10 March 2007. During the course of the building’s renovation between November 2005 and March 2007, the exhibition area was expanded from 200 to 700 square metres.

The new exhibition is entitled ‘That’s where I’m from – Martin Luther and Eisleben’ and shows about 250 exhibits spanning the period between the thirteenth and nineteenth centuries. It depicts the social conditions that prevailed in Luther’s formative years and communicates a sense of the late-mediaeval piety and special spirituality in which Martin Luther grew up.

The exhibition is divided into thirteen rooms, each of which is dedicated to a certain theme. On the ground floor, visitors can find out about the way of life of the ‘Luders’, as their name was commonly spelt at that time. The rooms are based on their original house. The exhibition also gives an account of the building’s history.

 

Addresses
Petrikirchplatz 22
06295 Lutherstadt Eisleben

Seminarstraße 16
06295 Lutherstadt Eisleben

www.martinluther.de

Eisleben, St. Andreaskirche

 

St. Andrew’s Church, first mentioned in 1180, is the parish church of Eisleben old town. The present building was erected in the late-fifteenth century and completely rebuilt following the Great Fire of Eisleben in 1498. Although the lower floors of the west building were preserved from the previous Romanesque structure, the original towers were replaced by two late-Gothic towers topped by narrow pointed Baroque cupolas.The late-Gothic interior, including a choir featuring a nave and two aisles, contains some outstanding items. The four-panel altar is one of the most important late-Gothic works of art in central Germany. And the impressive tomb of Count Hoyer VI of Mansfeld-Vorderort (the last Catholic Count of Mansfeld) who died in 1540 is a masterpiece of German Renaissance sculpture.St. Andrew’s Church is of utmost importance for Protestant Christians from all over the world. It was here that between 31 January and 15 February 1546, Martin Luther held his final four sermons and also installed two pastors. Luther’s pulpit has been preserved almost completely intact since this time. It was also at St. Andrew’s where Luther’s body was laid out before being taken via Halle to All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg.When St. Andrew’s was restored in1876/77, a new organ was built by Wilhelm Rühlmann from Zörbig. Featuring a total of 2,682 pipes, it has 42 stops on three manuals and a pedal. The chancel contains a small portable organ with four registers on a divided slider chest which was built by Albert Baumhoer’s organ-building company.

 

Address
Andreaskirchplatz 11
06295 Lutherstadt Eisleben
www.kirche-in-eisleben.de

Großpötzschau, Auferstehungskirche

© architektur-blicklicht.de

 

The town of Großpötzschau was originally a Slavic settlement and probably first came into being around 600AD as a Sackgassendorf, literally a “dead-end" village. German Christian colonialists then settled here in the twelfth century. It was probably at this time that the first church was built here, on the site of Großpötzschau’s present Church of the Resurrection. The eastern half, today the chancel, was part of an old village chapel built from rubble and Rochlitz porphyr in simple, early-Gothic style. The roof of this part was tiled, while the western half was thatched. In 1881, the church tower was struck by lightning and completely destroyed by fire. The church was then rebuilt, including a new tower, in the style of the eastern half. The church, which has remained virtually unchanged to this day, was re-consecrated in 1883.

From 1964 onwards, the village and church were directly threatened by the advance of the open-pit lignite mine. From then, the church – which is also called »Auenkirche« (»water meadow church«) – was left to fall into disrepair. In 1994, it was decided that the village would be conserved. However, given the church’s advanced state of dilapidation the Poppe organ had to be removed in 1996 and was for many years stored in a neighbouring barn. The organ was restored in several stages starting in 2009, but could not be returned to the church until it was rebuilt. The Poppe organ was re-dedicated on June 5, 2016.

 

Address
Großpötzschau 26
04579 Pötzschau

 

Leipzig, Alte Börse

Foto: Bach-Archiv Leipzig/Brigitte Braun

 

The Old Stock Exchange (Alte Handelsbörse) was built in the Baroque style by Johann Georg Starcke between 1678 and 1687, making it Leipzig’s first Baroque edifice. One striking feature is its symmetrical design. The centrepiece of its splendidly decorated façade is the coat of arms of the City of Leipzig. The initiative to construct the building came in April 1678 from 30 important merchants, the tradition having evolved of meeting together in a neutral place after the conclusion of major business transactions in order to seal the agreement. Trade took place in the vaulted rooms of the ground floor and stock market business in the reception room, which is accessed via a dual stairway. Today, small concerts and readings are held in the reconstructed building.

 

 

Address

Naschmarkt

04109 Leipzig

www.stadtgeschichtliches-museum-leipzig.de

 

Public Transport

S-Bahnlinien 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5X (station Markt), Straßenbahnlinien 4, 7, 15, 16 (station Augustusplatz), 3, 9 (station Thomaskirche), Buslinie 89 (station Markt)

Leipzig, Alte Nikolaischule

 

St. Nicholas’s Old School is one of the most valuable cultural monuments in central Leipzig. Schola Nicolaitana, the first public school in the city, finally opened here in 1512 under a Papal Bull originally issued by Boniface IX in 1395. The school’s famous ‘old boys’ include Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Johann Gottfried Seume and Richard Wagner. Despite its uniform appearance, St. Nicholas’s Old School actually consists of three separate buildings that grew together over the centuries.

Following the restoration of this listed building in 1992–94, it became a venue used by the Cultural Foundation of Leipzig. A cafe was opened on the ground floor, while the first floor houses Universität Leipzig’s Museum of Antiquity. The second floor containing a neoclassical auditorium dating back to 1827, a spacious lobby and a lounge is used for a wide variety of events such as readings, lectures and discussions as well as concerts and official functions. The top floor is home to the headquarters of the Cultural Foundation, which also uses the rooms in the basement for architectural exhibitions.

 

 

Address
Nikolaikirchhof 2
04109 Leipzig
www.kulturstiftung-leipzig.de
 

Public Transport
5 to 10 min. walk from the main station

Leipzig, Altes Rathaus

Foto: LTM/Andreas Schmidt

 

The Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus) in Leipzig is Germany’s oldest Renaissance town hall and was designed by Hieronymus Lotter in 1556; in the periods following, it underwent a number of reconstructions. One such reconstruction included the addition in 1599 of a platform above the town hall tower balcony used by the waits twice a day to perform the tower music. Inside, on the north face of the banqueting hall, there still survived the historical waits’ pew resting on Ionic columns arranged along walls that are covered with original paintings of Saxon sovereigns, Leipzig town councillors, majors and town magistrates. Immediately next to the banqueting hall there is a conference room called »Ratsstube« where Johann Sebastian Bach undersigned his contract as cantor of St. Thomas' and »Director musices«. Besides, this room exhibits one of the two paintings that are acknowledged to be definitely original portraits of Johann Sebastian Bach painted in oils by the Saxon court painter and appointed painter of the Leipzig town council Elias Gottlob Haussmann in 1746.

 

Address
Markt 1
04109 Leipzig
www.stadtgeschichtliches-museum-leipzig.de
 

Public transport

S-Bahnlinien 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5X (station Markt), Straßenbahnlinien 4, 7, 15, 16 (station Augustusplatz), 3, 9 (station Thomaskirche), Buslinie 89 (station Markt)

Leipzig, Auferstehungskirche Möckern

 

The district and former peasant village Möckern in northwestern part of Leipzig developed in the second half of the 19th century more and more to a suburb of the close city and was finally suburbanised in 1910. It was one of the theatres of war in the Battle of Leipzig (Battle of Nations) in 1813 and got heavily destroyed.

Taking into account the increasing demand of an own church in Möckern the resurrection church (Auferstehungskirche), planned by the architect Paul Lange from Leipzig, was built in 1901. In the beginning it was only planned as a temporary building but for more than 100 years it serves as the parish church of Möckern. The timber-framed front attracts attention from the outside, inside the wooden construction creates a warm atmosphere. However, regularly construction defects have to be repaired. The sanctuary and the smaller turrets were destroyed during a reconstruction between 1974 and 1981. Today the church is equipped with a simple wooden altar. An unusual fact is that the organ in the church is older than the building itself. The instrument was built in 1766 and is one of two of the last instruments built by university organ builder Johann Emanuel Schweinefleisch (1720–1771) who was probably in direct contact with Johann Sebastian Bach. Originally the organ was situated in the then reformed church at the St. Thomas churchyard that was later torn down. In the course of time the organ was changed several times: in 1841 by Johann Gottlob Mende (examined by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy), from 1870 until 1873 by Carl Bernecker. Bernecker enlarged the organ to 3 manuals and 1 pedal with 31 stops and adapted it in the choice of stops and the sound to the contemporary Romantic taste. In 1984 organ builder Hartmut Schüßler from Greiz was asked to reconstruct the instrument in the sense of Schweinefleisch, this was however not possible to be completed due to financial means and circumstances in former Eastern Germany. The organ could be restored in 2002 with the help of the association of friends of the organ and its celebrity members and it was ceremoniously reconsecrated on the 3rd of November in 2004. Today it is considered as the oldest church organ of Leipzig.

 

Address
Georg-Schumann-Straße 184
04159 Leipzig
www.glocke-leipzig.de
 

Public transport
Tram 10, 11 (station Dantestraße)

Leipzig, Bach-Museum mit Sommersaal

Foto: Bach-Archiv Leipzig/Martin Klindtworth

 

The Bose House that was built in the 16th century and which is situated in front of the St. Thomas Church, is home to the Bach Archive Leipzig and is part of the oldest buildings on the St. Thomas churchyard. A speciality is the Sommersaal (Summer Hall) that is unique in its form, a Baroque ballroom that was built by the then owner Georg Heinrich Bose in the course of an enlargement of the house in 1711. Already at that time the hall which could not be heated and could therefore only be used in summer attracted attention. In a document from 1731 it is described as a »precious« and »well decorated« room. The musician’s gallery that can be shut away with the help of a ceiling painting and that is situated above the hall and is called sound or echo chamber is a specialty of the room. There is place for up to 6 musicians on each side – depending on the instrument. They can play at festivities without being seen or disturbing.

As historical sources had not been considered much in the renovation for the 300th anniversary of Johann Sebastian Bach (1985), now after the renovation of 2002 concert and museum visitors are able to see the room in the state Bach might have seen it. The mirrors that are installed in the wall are in their three parts and the kind of fuzzy visual effect comes close to Baroque reality and the modest seeming curtains made of lined painted canvas were common for middle-class houses.During the complete renovation of the Bose House in 2008 and 2009, the summer hall was not much changed only the colour was refreshed and provides new splendour.

 

Address
Thomaskirchhof 16
04109 Leipzig
www.bachmuseumleipzig.de

 

Public transport
Bus 89, tram 9 (stationThomaskirche)

Leipzig, Evangelisch Reformierte Kirche

 

The Evangelical-reformed Church (Evangelisch-reformierte Kirche) was built in 1896–1899 to the plans of the Leipzig master builder Georg Weidenbach and his associate Richard Tschammer. It was the first historicist religious building in Leipzig to be influenced by the architecture of the Renaissance. On 4 December 1943, it was badly damaged by incendiary bombs. Reconstruction began immediately to a simplified interior design, corresponding to the basic Weidenbach type. With the communion table, pulpit and organ, with which the seating is aligned, arranged one above the other, the interior complies with requirements laid down by the so-called Wiesbaden Programme of 1891 for the design of Evangelical churches. The church obtained a Jehmlich organ in 1968. The last interior and exterior renovations were carried out in 1992–1996, with the result that the church now re-exerts its old influence from its dominant position on the northern city ring.

 

 

Address
Tröndlinring 7
04105 Leipzig
www.reformiert-leipzig.de
 

Public transport
Tram 1, 3, 4, 7, 12, 13, 15 (station Goerdelerring)

Leipzig, forum thomanum

 

»forum thomanum – ein großer Platz des Geistes, der der lebendigen Pflege von Musik gewidmet ist und zwar den Menschen, die am meisten begeisterungs- und entwicklungsfähig sind: der Jugend.«(»A grand spiritual place dedicated to musical culture that addresses those people who are most promising thanks to their enthusiastic resources: young people.«) Herbert Blomstedt, Music Director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra 1998-2005

By 2012 – which marked the 800th anniversary of Saint Thomas Church, St. Thomas Boys Choir (Thomanerchor) and St. Thomas School (Thomasschule) – an international education centre is due be completed that is committed to the Thomanerchor and Thomasschule and will include a day-care centre, a primary school, an international youth music academy and the Luther Church (Lutherkirche), the latter forming the centre of the prospected campus which will be reconstructed as a place of worship, school auditorium, concert hall, theatre and recording studio.

 

 

Addresses
Hillerstraße 7, 8
Sebastian-Bach-Straße 3
Ferdinand-Lassalle-Straße 25
04109 Leipzig
www.forum-thomanum.de
 

Public transport
Tram 1, 14 (station Marschnerstraße)

Leipzig, Gewandhaus

 

The Gewandhaus Orchestra owes its name to the place where it first performed, the hall opened in 1781 above the cloth store of the building of the clothmakers’ guild (Gewandhaus) in the historic Neumarkt. Just over a century later, on 11 December 1884, the New Gewandhaus, designed by the architects Martin Gropius and Heinrich Schmieden was officially opened in the »music quarter« of the city, opposite the University Library, earning praise for its outstanding acoustic qualities and the visual appeal of its inspired architecture. On 20 February 1944, it was badly damaged in an air raid and never rebuilt; the burned-out, shored up ruins were eventually demolished in 1968. For 35 years, the Conference Hall at the Zoo served as the base for the Gewandhaus Orchestra until, on 8 October 1981, the (second) New Gewandhaus was inaugurated on Karl-Marx-Platz (now renamed Augustusplatz) after a construction period of four years. In addition to the large hall with seating for almost 2000, the building has a smaller hall seating around 500 which, following renovations at the end of 1997, was named the Mendelssohn Hall.

 

Address
Augustusplatz 8
04109 Leipzig
www.gewandhaus.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 15, 16 (station Augustusplatz)

Leipzig, GRASSI Museum für Angewandte Kunst

Pfeilerhalle

 

The Grassimuseum is situated close to the city centre Leipzig at the Johannisplatz (John’s Square). The museum was named after a wealthy Leipzig merchant whose inheritance made the construction of several buildings in Leipzig possible. The museum complex is not only home to the Museum für Völkerkunde (Museum of Ethnography) and the Museum für Musikinstrumente (Museum for musical instruments) but also to the Museum für Angewandte Kunst (Museum of Applied Arts). At the end of 2007, after extensive renovations, it reopened its doors with the first of altogether three new permanent exhibitions. Entitled »From Antiquity to Historicism«, this first exhibition, which covers 30 rooms, features the oldest holdings of the collection and takes visitors on a journey through 2,500 years of art history. At the end of January 2010, also the second exhibition, entitled »Asian Art. Impulses for Europe«, opened its doors; the third, »From Art Nouveau to the Present Day«, opened in March, 2012.Other attractions of the museum include changing special exhibitions and the GRASSI FAIR hosted every year on the last weekend of October.

 

 

Address
Johannisplatz 5–11
04103 Leipzig
www.grassimuseum.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 12, 15 (station Johannisplatz/Grassimuseum)

Leipzig, GRASSI Museum für Musikinstrumente

 

The Grassimuseum is situated close to the city centre Leipzig at the John’s square (Johannisplatz). It was named after a wealthy Leipziger merchant whose inheritance made the construction of several buildings in Leipzig possible. The museum complex is not only home to the Museum of Applied Arts and the Museum of Ethnography but also to one of the largest collections of musical instruments in the world. The history of this collection traces back to the work of the Dutchman Paul de Wit (1852–1925) who lived in Leipzig. He opened in 1886 a museum at the Thomaskirchhof 16, today home to the Bach Museum, where he exhibited historical musical instruments and also played them from time to time. In 1905 the collection was sold to paper maker Wilhelm Heyer from Cologne. After his death the collection became with the help of a great donation by music publisher Henri Hinrichsen part of the possession of the Leipzig University and was brought to the north wing of the then newly built GRASSI Museum where the exhibition was ceremoniously opened on May 30th in 1929.

The Second World War caused severe damages to the collection and a considerable number of exhibits as well as the archive and the library became victims of a fire after a bomb raid in December 1943. The evacuated holdings were only partly brought back in good condition as theft and improper storage caused further losses. In the beginning of the 1950s the museum could be reconstructed and step by step be open again for the public. With specifically buying and several donations the museum’s holding was enlarged in the meantime and is today one of the largest in Germany. After a fundamental restoration the museum was reopened in 2006 and is shining now in new splendour. The museum’s »Zimelien Hall« is a room that fits perfectly for chamber concerts and lectures.

 

Address
Johannisplatz 5–11
04103 Leipzig
www.grassimuseum.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 12, 15 (station Johannisplatz/Grassimuseum)

Leipzig, Kath. Propsteikirche St. Trinitatis

© Bonifatiuswerk

Following the Reformation, no new Catholic church was built in Leipzig until 1847. However, the church of St. Trinitatis, situated to the west of Pleissenburg castle (today the site of New City Hall), was severely damaged by bombing raids in 1943-44, and in 1954 its ruins were demolished to make way for a new church. The city council kept delaying the decision to rebuild, however, and the second priory church, built on Emil-Fuchs-Strasse bordering Rosental park, was not consecrated until 1982. After just 20 years, damp and building defects caused damage that would have cost more to repair than a new building.
To the south of New City Hall – within view of the site of the original St. Trinitatis – the first foundation stone was finally laid for the new, third, Priory Church of St. Trinitatis on April 27, 2013, and the church was consecrated on May 9, 2015. The design chosen was that of Leipzig architects Schulz & Schulz, first and foremost because of its sustainable approach: the electricity for the church is supplied by photovoltaic panels, and the tower holds a tank to collect rainwater which is treated and used for building maintenance and operation purposes.
This largest church construction project in eastern Germany post 1990 was made possible by numerous donations from private sponsors in Germany and abroad, from numerous companies, from the Bonifatiuswerk church aid organization – and even from the Evangelical Church: St. Thomas’s Church, for example, donated several collections, sending out strong signals in favour of ecumenism in Leipzig.
In 2016, the Priory Church of St. Trinitatis was the main venue of the 100th German Catholic Congress.

 

Address
Nonnenmühlgasse 2
04107 Leipzig
 

Public transport
S-Bahn-Linien 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5X (station Wilhelm-Leuschner-Platz), tram 2, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14 (statiom Wilhelm-Leuschner-Platz)

Leipzig, Krystallpalast Varieté

 

The year of 1882 saw the opening of Leipzig’s first, biggest and presumably most famous variety theatre – the »Crystal Palace« (»Krystallpalast«), a complex composed of glass and iron whose theatre auditorium, conservatory, exhibition hall, restaurants and party rooms accommodated a total of 15,000 people. It was regarded as the largest place of public entertainment found in Germany. What is more, a giant 36 m height circus hall was opened in 1887 which accommodated 3,000 visitors. Apart, the Krystallpalast was the home of Leipzig’s biggest restaurant. More than 1,000 guests were served each night. In one night of bombing in 1943, the whole splendour was reduced to rubble.

54 years later, a new venue opened in the Magazingasse as the first – and to this day only – variety theatre established in the new newly-formed German states. In the 2003/04 night of New Year’s Eve the grand hall was completely gutted which meant another new beginning. The owner seized the opportunity and thoroughly reconstructed the building, eliminating existing defects, and optimising the space capacities and technical facilities.

 

Address
Magazingasse 4
04109 Leipzig
www.krystallpalast.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 12, 15 (station Augustusplatz), 16 (station Roßplatz), 2, 8, 9, 10, 11 (station Wilhelm-Leuschner-Platz)

Leipzig, Lutherkirche

 

The Luther Church (Lutherkirche) has a 58m high tower and was built in the territory of the Johannapark in neo-Gothic style between 1883 and 1886. When Julius Zeißig designed the building, he was as young as 28. The church survived Second World War bombardments without damages. The organ was completed in 1886 as well by the Borna organ builder Richard Kreutzbach, yet it was damaged just two years later by fire. It underwent a restoration in Saalfeld before it was newly dedicated in August 2000. In 2002, the parish of the Lutherkirche was merged with the Thomaskirche parish which, on its turn, represented a merger of the former two parishes of St. Thomas und St. Matthäi; today, the Lutherkirche is used only casually for church service. It became integrated into the concept of the forum thomanum to complete a central function as a place of worship, school auditorium, concert hall, theatre and recording studio.

 

Address
Ferdinand-Lassalle-Str. 25
04105 Leipzig
www.forum-thomanum.de
 

Public transport

Tram 1, 8, 14 (station Westplatz)

Leipzig, Markt

Foto: Bach-Archiv Leipzig/Gert Mothes

 

The Leipzig market square (Markt Leipzig) is located in the city centre. The city coat of arms is embedded into the mosaic pavement at the centre of the 10.000m² square. The eastern length is framed by the arcades of the Altes Rathaus (Old Town Hall, 1556), the oldest still existing building on the square. Some of the historic buildings on the north side were rebuilt after World War II, for example the Alte Waage (Old Weigh House). The southern length is framed by historic buildings such as Königshaus (Kings' House) and Barthels Hof (Barthel's Court) as well as new and altered buildings, which imitate historic silhouettes.Early on, the market square was the centre of public life, a great share of the goods handled during the fairs were traded here. Before 1500, the market square was also the scene for knights festivals while at the same time being the place of public executions and political demonstrations.Nowadays, city festivals, markets, and fairs take place on the market square, also of course the Leipziger Weihnachtsmarkt (Christmas fair), one of the most traditional of its kind in Germany.

 

 

Address
Markt
04109 Leipzig
 

Public transport
S-Bahnlinien 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5X (station Markt), Tram 4, 7, 15, 16 (station Augustusplatz), 3, 9 (station Thomaskirche), Bus 89 (station Markt)

Leipzig, Michaeliskirche

 

The Michaeliskirche (St. Michael’s Church), along with Peterskirche (St. Peter’s Church) and Altes Rathaus (Old Town Hall), forms part of the main north-south axis running through the city centre. The church with its marble alter is therefore not set up to face east, like usual, but instead faces north. It was built between 1901 and 1904 as a successful synthesis of Art Nouveau and German Renaissance elements, the monumental facade with its 72-meter high steeple bearing witness to the prosperity and self-confidence of Leipzig’s bourgeoisie at the turn of the century. The interior is marked by noteworthy wood carvings on the galleries, pews and pulpit, colourful choir windows, and the original, three-manual Sauer organ with 46 stops and an ornately carved Art Nouveau front.

 

Address
Nordplatz 14
04155 Leipzig
www.michaelis-friedens.de
 

Public transport
Tram 12 (station Nordplatz)

Leipzig, Nikolaikirche

Foto: LTM/Andreas Schmidt

 

One of the oldest churches in Leipzig, the Nikolaikirche (St. Nicholas’s Church) has always been closely connected with the city’s history and the lives of its inhabitants. It may be this special connection which the citizens feel they have with their city and parish church that has engendered the persistent changes the church’s exterior and interior went through. Whatever shape St. Nicholas’s Church took as is was developing from the original Romanesque basilica with its massive twin tower assembly to a Gothic hall church which became extended by another tower before it underwent a classicistic re-design of the interior: the church has always reflected the self-understanding of the citizens.

When it comes to musical activities, St. Nicholas’s Church has been affiliated to its neighbouring church St. Thomas’s Church (Thomaskirche) from time immemorial. While St. Nicholas’s Church is regarded as Leipzig’s main parish church, it never employed an own choirmaster and organist. Instead, it was the choirmaster of the Thomasschule – and, during his Leipzig period between 1723 and 1750, Johann Sebastian Bach, too – who was responsible for the church music performed in the two main churches St. Nicholas und St. Thomas, as well as in the New St. Matthew’s Church (Neue Kirche St. Matthäi) and St. Peter’s Church (Peterskirche).

Please find a seating plan here.

There are many columns in St. Nicholas’s Church.

BF_Orte_Leipzig, Nikolaikirche_Saeulen.JPG


Address
Nikolaikirchhof
04109 Leipzig
www.nikolaikirche.de

Public transport
5 bis 10 Min. zu Fuß vom Hauptbahnhof

Leipzig, Paul-Gerhardt-Kirche

© Lumu.jpg

 

In what today is Connewitz’s busy centre there has stood, for nearly 500 hundred years, a stone column with an image of Christ on the side facing the city of Leipzig. The »Connewitz Cross« was once located just a stone’s throw from the old village of Connewitz and only gradually »shifted« to the centre of the hamlet as it spread northwards. In immediate proximity to it is Paul Gerhardt Church. Designed by architect Julius Zeissig, its architecture is based on German Renaissance forms. The groundbreaking took place on April 4, 1898, and two years later, on April 1, 1900, it was consecrated and opened for worship. It was initially referred to as »Connewitz New Church« without any particular name; not until in 1934 did the parish council, on the orders of the regional church authority, baptise it »Paul Gerhardt Church«.

Standing on an artificially elevated plot, the church is oriented East-West. The defining characteristic of the exterior of this hall church is the charming contrast between the architectural elements in reddish Rochlitz porphyr and the light-coloured, painted walls. The 60m-high tower stands at the eastern end, with the main portal in a narrow porch.

 

Address
Selneckerstraße 5
04277 Leipzig
www.connewitz-loessnig.de
 

Public transport
Tram 9, 10, 11 (station Connewitzer Kreuz)

Leipzig, Peterskirche

The Peterskirche (St. Peter’s Church), built 1882–1885, represents an outstanding neo-Gothic structure in Saxony, and one of the most excellent symbols of the historicism found throughout the German-speaking area. In terms of enclosed space, it is Leipzig’s biggest church with the tallest tower found in the city (88 meters) that dominates the skyline of the southern suburb of Leipzig. A hall church, the Peterskirche follows German tradition, but it also refers to the Gothic style typical in French cathedrals. Its exterior and interior design, structural completion and the role it plays within the urbanistic picture make it a complex artwork of outstanding importance.

 

Address
Schletterstraße 5
04107 Leipzig
www.peterskirche-leipzig.de
 

Public transport
Tram 10, 11 (station Hohe Straße)

Leipzig, PROMENADEN Hauptbahnhof (main station)

 

After the German Reunification, the Deutsche Bahn AG (German national railway company) resolved to maintain the striking façade of the Leipzig main station, the largest terminal train station in Europe, and to renovate the building so that it would serve as a point of public interest even beyond the city bounds. A group of private investors from the Deutsche Bank AG and the ECE Group refurbished it, following standards for the renovation of historical buildings while adding some modern elements. Since then, the imposing 300 meter-wide entrance hall has shone in renewed brilliance. The basement and ground levels of the entrance hall, as well as the 250 meter platform were made into a shopping and service center on three floors with direct access to the Leipzig pedestrian Nikolaistrasse area. In only two years, 1.6 million cubic meters of space have been renovated, at a total cost of 250 million Euros.

The Promenades have received numerous national and international awards for representing an exemplary pilot project for the revitalization of historic main stations. Following the renovation of the Promenades, which were first opened in 1997, the shopping quarter in the Leipzig city center was expanded by 30,000 square meters housing nearly 140 businesses. Each day, the Promenades are used by between 80,000 and 150,000 people from all over Germany.

 

Address
Willy-Brandt-Platz
04109 Leipzig
www.promenaden-hauptbahnhof-leipzig.de

Leipzig, Salles de Pologne

The Hôtel de Pologne is located at Hainstraße 16/18 in the heart of Leipzig's city center. Into the 19th century, three buildings stood on the spot, including the hotels »Zum Goldenen Adler« (»The Golden Eagle«) and »Zum Birnbaum« (»The Pear Tree«), where Martin Luther stayed in 1519. In 1819, C. A. Pausch purchased each of the buildings. To commemorate a visit by the king of Poland Stanisław I. Leszcyński, Pausch named his new property »Hôtel de Pologne«. In 1846, the buildings were destroyed in a fire, after which point construction was begun on what was then to be the largest hotel in Leipzig, with 130 rooms on five floors, a courtyard, and an impressive outdoor marble staircase. In 1892 and 1893, the famous Leipzig architect Arwed Roßbach was commissioned to carve an elaborate Florentine Renaissance style relief for the façade. The hotel was used both as a place in which to spent the night and as a location for parties and balls, which were held in the large (250 square meters), festive Baroque Revival ballroom. This room was completed in 1893 following a design by Ludwig Heim, and had space for 1,500 guests.

During WWI, the building was converted to a hospital, and in 1917 all hotel business was abandoned. Only the ballroom remained open to the public, where parties and culinary events were still hosted. In the years that followed, under the Weimar Republic, the building was used as a convention center, and from the early 1950s until after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it housed the offices of the Leipzig department of conventions and fairs, which converted the ballroom into a blue-tiled industrial kitchen.

In 2008, the Leipzig development company Stadtbau A.G. carried out an exhaustive historic renovation and restoration of the building in order to recreate the its interior and exterior as they had been in 1893. The ballroom was opened to the public for the first time on Heritage Day, on December 9, 2010. Since 2010, the Grand Ballroom, the Green Room, and the Lodge Hall, as well as two foyers and other smaller rooms have been available for use as event space.

 

Address
Hainstraße 16/18
04109 Leipzig
 

Public transport
Tram 1, 3, 4, 7, 12, 13, 15 (station Goerdelerring)

Leipzig, Schaubühne Lindenfels

© Schaubühne Lindenfels

 

The restaurant and »society hall« (Gesellschaftshalle) as it was known, was built between 1874 and 1876. Plain on the outside, the building concealed a magnificent ballroom with a gallery running all the way round, supported by decorated pillars, and an orchestra shell. The building was extended around the turn of the century and decorated with a Wilhelminian, art nouveau-inspired façade with a terrace and staircase. Films were shown here regularly from 1913. The cinema on Karl Heine Street became a state-owned operation in 1949 and was named »Lichtspieltheater Lindenfels«. It was renovated in 1956 and remained in operation until the boiler broke down in the winter of 1987. After that, the heating system was shut down and the cinema closed.

Since 1994, Schaubühne Lindenfels has been a Leipzig production and performance venue with an interdisciplinary concept. Its programme features primarily theatre, dance, performance and film, but also music, literature, the new media and the visual arts. Besides its own productions, co-productions with local artists and visiting productions by international theatre companies, the theatre also carries out public art projects and is a focal point for the development of Leipzig West as a culturally active district.

 

Address
Karl-Heine-Str. 50
04229 Leipzig
www.schaubuehne.com
 

Public transport
Tram 14 (station Merseburger Str.)

Leipzig, Schumann-Haus

 

The Schumann-Haus (Schumann House) is located in a wonderful, classicistic building. Robert and Clara Schumann moved into one of its apartments after their wedding in September 1840. Today, the bel étage, where the famous couple lived during the first four years of their marriage, accommodates a museum. The other rooms of the building are used by the Clara Schumann school, a private elementary school.In the house in Leipzig’s Inselstraße, Robert Schumann composed the »Spring Symphony«, which established his fame as a world-renowned composer. He also wrote numerous articles for »Neue Zeitschrift für Musik«, a music journal he had founded in 1834. Sharing a life with her husband, Clara Schumann, who had already made a name for herself as a pianist performing under her maiden name Clara Wieck, was inspired to develop new thematic interests and perfect her art. Also during this period, the couple’s two daughters, Marie and Elise, were born in the Inselstraße house.The Schumann-Saal, where today numerous concerts are held, is restored to its original beauty. Here the Schumanns welcomed many famous composers and intellectuals of their time, among them Franz Liszt, Felix Mendelsohn Bartholdy, Richard Wagner, Hector Berlioz, and Hans Christian Andersen, the Danish fairytale writer.

 

 

Address
Inselstraße 18
04103 Leipzig
www.schumann-verein.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 12, 15 (station Johannisplatz) and Tram 1, 8, 13 (station Hofmeisterstraße)

Leipzig, Spizz

 

Leipzig, Spizz

Designed by Emil Franz Hänsel, regarded as the most original and successful architect of Leipzig commercial buildings at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Handels- und Bürohaus at no. 9, Markt, was built in 1913. It is one of Hänsel’s most elegant buildings, combining elements of art deco, art nouveau and classicism. Its unusual features, found nowhere else in Leipzig, are the glazed ceramic cladding at the ground and mezzanine floor levels and the integration of life-size figurative reliefs in the fourth-floor window jambs. The architrave shows the medallions of seven Saxon cities with allegorical motifs. »King Albert House«, as the building is known, is an unmistakable and well-known address in the centre of the trade fair city. This splendid commercial building on Marktplatz has been lovingly restored in line with its historical monument status.

Jazzkeller Spizz, which opened in 1996, has already hosted numerous international jazz greats, including Nils Landgren, The Pasadena Roof Orchestra, Klaus Doldinger, Joe Zawinul, Billy Cobham, Maceo Parker and Jocelyn B. Smith.

 

Address
Markt 9
04109 Leipzig

Leipzig, Thomaskirche

Foto: Bach-Archiv Leipzig

 

The discovery of silver in the Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains) at the end of the 15th century brought great economic prosperity to Leipzig. The city’s churches were renovated and expanded over the next 40 years as a result. The Romanesque nave of the previous Thomaskirche (St. Thomas' Church), whose foundations probably dated back to 1160, was hence demolished in 1482 and a new Late Gothic hall church was erected, which was consecrated in 1496 and still stands today. With the exception of the steeple, which took on its final form in 1702, nothing of the St. Thomas Church’s architecture has changed since then.

The most severe alterations to the interior decoration of the church resulted from the renovations of 1884–89, during which the entire Baroque-era decor, from the period when Johann Sebastian Bach was active at St. Thomas' Church, was removed. Since then the interior of the church has been neo-Gothic in style. The first thorough restoration of St. Thomas Church in over 100 years was made possible following the reunification of the two German states. This was largely completed by the 250th anniversary of Bach’s death on July 28, 2000. The construction of the new Bach organ was also part of this project.

Please find a seating plan here.

 

Address
Thomaskirchhof
04109 Leipzig
www.thomaskirche.org
 

Public transport
Tram 9, bus 89 (station Thomaskirche)

Leipzig, UT Connewitz

 

UT Connewitz is Leipzig’s oldest surviving picture house and one of the oldest in Germany. The first film was screened here on Christmas Day, 1912. The name »UT«  (standing for Union-Theater) is a reference to »Union«, one of Germany’s most successful cinema chains in Germany, of which U.T. was the trademark. The first owners of our cinema never belonged to this early cinema chain, but hoped to profit from its good reputation by their choice of name ... From the 1970s, the cinema figured among the Leipzig-owned cinemas and was called »Filmtheater Connewitz«. It was then used for a variety of purposes, including Jugendweihe (youth initiation) celebrations and concerts, as well as being a meeting place for the GDR punk scene. UT Connewitz was closed in 1992. In 2001, the »UT Connewitz« association was created with the goal of re-opening the historical picture house as a cultural centre and conserving the building. Since then, it has hosted cultural activities on a regular basis, with concerts, film screenings, readings, theatre and other events.

The stage is remarkable for its architecture, featuring a relief resembling a portico with columns. The auditorium’s interior, right down to the seating – which is admittedly in poor condition – is largely the same as it was in 1912.

 

Address
Wolfgang-Heinze-Straße 12a
04277 Leipzig
www.utconnewitz.de
 

Public transport
Tram 9, 10, 11 (station Connewitzer Kreuz)

Leipzig, Zeitgeschichtliches Forum

 

The exhibitions and events at the Zeitgeschichtliches Forum Leipzig (Forum of Contemporary History) are an attraction for visitors from the region and beyond. The Forum belongs to the House of History Foundation in Bonn hosting a permanent exhibition dedicated to the history of the separation and reunification of Germany and to dictatorship and resistance in former Eastern Germany. About 3,200 objects and various audio-visual presentations are on display on 2,000 square metres of floor space. With temporary exhibitions and a number of other events, the house is a lively forum of dealing with the past and the present.

The information centre provides more details on the different exhibitions. It offers a reference and media library with a wide selection of books, newspapers, magazines and audio-visual material.

Admission to the Forum of Contemporary History Leipzig is free.

 

Address
Grimmaische Straße 6
04109 Leipzig
www.hdg.de
 

Public transport
Tram 4, 7, 15, 16 (stop Augustusplatz), bus 89 (stop Reichsstraße)

Leipzig, Zoo

Foto: Zoo Leipzig

 

The Zoo Leipzig was founded in 1878 by a restaurateur, it today looks back upon one of the longest traditions throughout Germany. Ernst Pinkert’s initial intention was to exhibit exotic animals to attract visitors, and he was very successful with this. But the core business was to fade into the background soon, and it took just 20 years for the private zoo to become a public company.

130 years after its foundation, the »Zoo der Zukunft« (»zoo pointing to the future«) keeps up with the most recent developments. Since 1999, it has undergone a complete reconstruction producing more and more adventure worlds offering natural environments to rare species such as Nerpas, Musk deers or Okapis. The reconstruction measures were completed in 2011 when the giant tropical hall »Gondwana-Land« whose foundation stone was laid in 2007.

 

Address
Pfaffendorfer Straße 29
04105 Leipzig
www.zoo-leipzig.de
 

Public transport:
Tram 12 (stop Zoo)

Lochau, Dorfkirche St. Anna

 

The Saint Anna’s Church is the Protestant church of the village of Lochau, which belongs to the town of Schkopau in Saxony-Anhalt. Most of the church as we know it today dates from 1792, although parts of it are older. This hall church has a church tower with a square floor plan on the West side of the nave. The upper section of the tower is octagonal, however, and is topped by a dome and lantern. You enter the church through a tower gate on the West side. The wall at the East end of the nave has angles dividing it into three sections, while at the North end there is a patron’s gallery with a Baroque portal. The church has a barrel-vaulted ceiling. The entire interior is designed in the classical style. Its noteworthy features are the pulpit-altar with its Ionic columns, a semi-circular, two-storey gallery on the North side, and the baptismal font. The church also has a niche for the sacraments. On the South side of the nave is the epitaph for Johann Wilhelm von Lüder, who died in 1792. The organ was built in 1874.

 

Address
Kirchwinkel
06258 Schkopau

 

Naumburg, Dom St. Peter und Paul

 

The city Naumburg on the Saale River was chosen around 1000 as the new family home by Ekkehard I, margrave of Meißen, as it is situated conveniently at the junction of several trade routes. Already in 1028 Naumburg became bishop’s see. The first cathedral, a previous building to today’s cathedral, was consecrated in 1042. Exactly 200 years later the late Romanesque new building of the nave was completed which can still be seen today. The east and west choir were rebuilt in Gothic style in the 13th and 14th century. The cathedral was further reconstructed and restored until the 19th century. Especially the towers of the cathedral are witnesses of the different stylistic periods. Due to its Romanesque-Gothic architecture and especially because of its early Gothic monumental sculpture and construction ornamentation the Naumburg cathedral is one of the most important cultural monuments of medieval times. The life-sized statues of the donators in the west choir that were created in the 13th century by an unknown so-called »Naumburg master« as well as the image of the Passion of Christ at the Western chancel screen impress by their realistic creation. The late Romanesque crypt, the eastern chancel screen and the medieval stained windows are significant examples concerning architecture and culture history. The organ of the Naumburg cathedral was built by the organ builder Eule in 1983.

 

Address
Domplatz 16/17
06618 Naumburg
www.naumburger-dom.de

Naumburg, Stadtpfarrkirche St. Wenzel

 

Rising majestically on the south side of the market square, the St. Wenceslas Parish Church (Stadtpfarrkirche St. Wenzel) is a landmark of the city of Naumburg. The oldest documentary evidence of the church goes back to 1228, its incorporation into the cathedral chapter occurring only fifty years later. In 1411 it was struck for the first time by one of the many fires in the city and had to be rebuilt. Further conflagrations and rebuilding followed. The three-story altar wall with diagonally placed sides was built by the court sculptor of Zeitz, Heinrich Schau, between 1677 and 1680. The altarpiece was begun in 1683 by Dresden painter Johann Oswald Harms. The complete remodelling of the church in Baroque style followed in 1724, at which time the vaulted ceiling was also put into place.A new organ was built by Gottfried Silbermann’s pupil Zacharias Hildebrandt between 1743 and 1746, being installed in the Baroque organ case built from 1695 to 1697 by sculptor Johannn Göricke. On September 27, 1746 the organ was tested by Johann Sebastian Bach, cantor of Leipzig’s St. Thomas Church, and organ-builder Gottfried Silbermann. The instrument was restored and expanded several times. During the latest repair phase from 1993, the organ was restored to its original state from 1746.Also worth mentioning is the costly interior decoration, such as two paintings from the workshop of Lucas Cranach the Elder (»Let the children come to Me« and »The adoration of the Magicians«) and the tombstone of August von Leubelfing, page of the Swedish king Gustav Adolf.

 

Address
Topfmarkt
06618 Naumburg
www.kirche-naumburg.de

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